No to corruption. Yes to families.

14 03 2011

by Rebecca Harris, Director of Programs & Services

The following as an excerpt from our newsletter, Mbali’s Message.  Sign up to receive it by clicking here.

Already in 2011 we’ve seen Ethiopia move to reduce intercountry adoptions by 90% and Kazakhstan officially suspend adoptions in anticipation of their ratification of the Hague Convention.  Haiti and Ukraine are on what we’ve termed our “high alert” list – countries that show indications of closing in the next 12-months. This is a scene we’ve seen play out over and over again, in country after country.  And every time a country has chosen to suspend or close intercountry adoptions, children suffer.  It’s a scene that is quite frankly, confusing, unneccessary, and very disturbing.
In allowing this to occur, we’ve failed the biological families who need preservation services, we’ve failed the children who legitimately need intercountry adoption and we’ve failed our global community.  I don’t know about you, but I’m tired of failure.  I’m tired of seeing children, like Addison, become “collateral damage” in the battle against abuse.  Allowing children to die needlessly and alone is simply unacceptable.

Over the last ten years we’ve fought the good fight.  But we’ve lost too many times.  And every time we lose, children lose.  This month we’ll release a report about the systematic elimination of intercountry adoption and the decrease in services to children.  And we’ll ask you to join us in changing the tide.  We’ll ask you to rally your friends and family to stand up and say “No” to corruption and “Yes” to families.  It’s not enough to just stop bad things from happening – we have to make good things happen too!

So, be on the look out over the next month – in your inbox and our website – I hope you’ll join me in standing up and demanding the fulfillment of every child’s right to a safe, permanent and loving family.  Join me in speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves.





Be The Answer for Himani

21 11 2010

To learn more about Joint Council’s National Adoption Month Advocacy Campaign-Click Here

Himani is a bundle of energy!!  She lives in an orphanage in southern India and just recently learned to walk with a cane.  This little one is blind, but is anxious for affection and love. Himani is three years old and attends  pre-school.  She loves to play with the other children and LOVES to dance!  Himani rushes to those who speak to her and clearly wants to be held and loved. Himani waits for a family who can give her guidance and boundaries.  She will need a lot of attention and love to find her way in life, but I know the effort will be worth it in the end!  Who will dance with her at her wedding?

Himani doesn’t  have An Answer, but is patiently waiting for one.   Be The Answer for Himani and another child by submitting a photo to our 2010-2011 photo contest! Information can be found here





Be The Answer for Banoo

7 11 2010

To learn more about Joint Council’s National Adoption Month Advocacy Campaign-Click Here

I watched little Banoo come into the room and her face was so serious.  She is nearly five years old and had been found abandoned, malnourished and scarred by abuse.  Beautiful little Banoo has scars on her face, head, arms and legs from burns, marks on her wrist that indicates she was tied at some point.  She has been in the orphanage for nearly two years and although I didn’t see a smile cross her face during my visit, I saw intelligent eyes and the potential for a child to be happy.  We know Banoo will need a lot of love to get past the scars inflicted upon her – the ones that are visible and the ones that I’m sure exist and are invisible.  She will need counseling, support and patience to trust and know she will not be hurt or left hungry.

It’s not too late for Banoo.  Yes, she is underserved, but she yearns for love like all children.  It is not too late, but she still waits  for a family who cares.  To learn more about Banoo, contact Deb Dryer (ddreyer@CHSFS.org) at Children’s Home Society and Family Services.  Children’s Home Society and Family Services website can be found by clicking here.

Were you inspired this week through these stories? Be the Answer for Banoo and other children by submitting your personal story about a child who impacted your life.  Your story will help us advocate for more children. Visit here for more information on how to submit your story!








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