Notes from Dept of State Ethiopia Call

11 03 2011

Following are our notes from the Department of State Office of Children’s Issues conference call regarding Ethiopian adoptions.  These notes do not represent nor are they  in any way attributable to the Department of State or US Citizenship and Immigration Services.  We are providing the notes with respect to those adoption service providers who could not participate in the conference.

We extend our thanks to the Department of State for conducting the conference call and to US Citizenship and Immigration Services for their participation and contributions.

The Department of State is Actively Involved
•    The Ethiopian Ministry of Women’s, Children’s and Youth Affairs announced a reduction in the processing of intercountry adoption cases from 50 per day to 5 per day, effective March 10, 2011.
•    The Department of State is actively involved in discussions with the Government of Ethiopia, other governments and stakeholders.
•    A coalition of countries is preparing a proposal to assist the Ministry increase its capacity.
•    Embassy suggested that children with special need’s cases should not be delayed.
•    The US Embassy officials have a scheduled meeting with the Ministry of Women’s, Children’s and Youth Affairs for Monday, March 14, 2011.
•    There are areas of concern related to intercountry adoption, however the reduction is disproportionate.

Adoption Cases
•    Currently there are no implementation guidelines for in-process cases.
•    For adoption cases registered with the Ethiopian court, the best estimate is a one-year delay.
•    The staff change at the Ministry of Women’s, Children’s and Youth Affairs has been confirmed as taking effect the week of March 13, 2011.  The impact this will have on adoption cases is not known.
•    It is estimated that between 800-1,000 adoption cases are currently on the docket of Ethiopian courts.

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5 responses

11 03 2011
Pat

• For adoption cases registered with the Ethiopian court, the best estimate is a one-year delay.

Who is registered? When does a person become registered? I am trying to figure out where I fit in to all of this, well into the wait (nearing 2 years) but without a referral yet.

Thank you for your assistance.

11 03 2011
Leigh

Thanks Pat for your comment. I have the same questions regarding the following.

• Currently there are no implementation guidelines for in-process cases.

What is the definition of “in-process cases”? Waiting for a court date, waiting for the embassy appt.???

• For adoption cases registered with the Ethiopian court, the best estimate is a one-year delay.

What cases are “registered with Ethiopian court”? Is this the group waiting for referrals or the group with referrals waiting for a court date?

• It is estimated that between 800-1,000 adoption cases are currently on the docket of Ethiopian courts

Are these cases waiting for a court date, have been assigned a court date but waiting to pass court?

Thanks very much

11 03 2011
Allison

Same Questions as above. My parents have been waiting 5 months 10 days for their referral. I just want my siblings home.

11 03 2011
Holly

If there are 1000 cases on the court docket and they work about 250 days per year (guestimate, subtracting weekends, holidays, rainy season closure) – and they limit to 5 per day, then my math tells me 4 years wait time. Freaking out in California (court date for child early April).

12 03 2011
PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION!!!!

[…] on Orphans:  On a conference call this morning, the U.S. State Department said that MOWA now has 800 – 1,000 files […]

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